Thursday, 7 July 2016

An Apology That Will Lead To Justice


Blair must face justice for the decisions he made. 
Yesterday the hurt and anguish felt by so many families of service men and women was laid bare. After 7 years The Iraq Inquiry, chaired by Lord Chilcot was finally produced. At over 2.6 million words in length the complete findings will take some time to be poured over. What the 150 page summary did produce was damning evidence as to the ineptitude of the intelligence provided, the legitimacy to go to war and the planning for during and aftermath of the invasion. While this report has added fresh impetus to the responsibilities and criminal actions by several in the UK government, not least the Prime Minister. It will be scant relief for those families, nor a nation which has lost 250,000 lives and been plunged into a world of extreme violence and terrorism.

One line in the 150 page summary of the report which particularly stands out is Blair telling Bush that he ‘will be with him, whatever.’ This highlights the obvious corruption and criminal negligence in avoiding any attempts to achieve a more peaceful resolution. That he was willing to fabricate, or at best exaggerate the intelligence findings and push through a war on a country, based on deception, lies and an alternative agenda of oil excavation.

There is no doubt that Saddam Hussein was a despotic tyrant, but not any more so than others who Blair courted during his reign and which Britain have played a role in installing when it has suited their agenda. Hussein himself was at one time the preferred dictator of the UK and US, with them arming him in his war against Iran. However, despite his dictatorial regime it is incredible for Blair to that Iraq is in a better place than under Hussein’s rule especially not after this weekend when over 200 Iraqis died in yet another terrorist attack.

Iraq is now in the midsts of a bloody civil war between the Sunnis and Shaites, they have been invaded and poisoned by terrorism and in the North faced with the Islamic State regime. Make no mistake this is a direct consequence of the invasion by UK and US forces. The fact Blair still refuses to accept this or apologise for his role in the destruction of a once peaceful nation speaks volumes about his integrity and moral fibre.
The consequences of regime change has lead to terror and destruction in Iraq.
Nor does he display any semblance of guilt in putting British armed forces in danger, many losing their lives or suffering serious injury. The refusal to meet families of soldiers who lost their lives such as Rose, the mother of Fusilier Gordon Gentle shows his contempt for the consequences of his decisions made in office.

What is clear is that he must face some form of punishment for his actions. It is my understanding that the International Criminal Court will only look at abuses from soldiers. They fact that those who sent them there in the first place will not be tried, beggars belief. Neither will there be prosecution of Blair in England, even the chances of a trial for war crimes are unlikely in Scotland unless new legislation is introduced. Therefore I ask, no I plead with the Scottish Parliament to introduce an Iraq War Crimes Bill to allow justice to be done and for Blair and others who were culpable be convicted for their actions.

While Blair ducked and dived away from meeting any families of any responsibility in his media appearances. It has been left to the current leader to stand up and do the decent honourable thing and apologise on behalf of the Labour Party for leading Britain into this war. He apologised not only to the people of Iraq but to our own armed forces and the families of those who have lost. Dignified and respectful; in one day Jeremy Corbyn has done more to improve Middle East relations than Blair did in 13 years in power. He looked and acted like a true leader. As opposed to Tim ‘told you so’ Farron and Dodgy Dave, whose hero Blair was defended to the hilt. It is of no surprise that the Blairites and the likes of Hilary Benn were so keen to remove Corbyn before yesterday as his humanity and conscience only made their attitudes and views all the more repellent.

The lessons are there to be learned from the Chilcot report but I doubt the usual suspects will ever learn. That is why the leadership of Corbyn has been so refreshing. As someone who has long opposed the war in Iraq, his morality in this is without question. He was not the one who needed to apologise, yet he took that step as it was the right thing to do. I commented in an article last week that Corbyn was the right leader at the right time for the Labour Party. Yesterday he proved that in spades.

This will not however bring back the loved ones lost in our armed forces or those casualties from Iraq. This will not stop the continual bloodshed, including over 200 lives being lost this past weekend. Apologies will not repair their lives, will not fix a country in ruins, but it is an important first step on the way to justice. Something Mr Blair must surely face if we are to maintain any sense of morality in this world.

2 comments:

  1. I take on everything that has been said in this posting. Nevertheless, we also have an even worse situation next door in Syria and that has not been all the fault of the West, in particular the Americans, the Brits and the French as well as the Russians.
    Assad was another cruel dictator who ruled, as his father did before him, with an iron fist in a police state. His militia, the Shabbiha, was unparalleled for cruelty, torture and human rights abuses.
    When the Arab uprisings started about five and a half years ago it was widely recognised the Syria would be the most difficult nut to crack. During that time a myriad of mostly Islamist groups (also known as Takfiri, Wahhabi or Salafists) proliferated as it become a rallying call for every extremist Muslim on the planet to come and fight for Allah. In the time over 500,000 have perished, whole cities twice the size of Glasgow have been reduced to rubble and a refugee crisis of biblical proportions has engulfed Europe, not to mention neighbouring Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Interestingly, it has not affected Saudi Arabia
    My point then is this: is it not about time that we started blaming the guilty parties for all this chaos? Namely the chief characters in this are Assad, ISIS and the other Islamists such as the Al Nusra Front, the Army of Conquest, the Free Syrian Army and the Shia groups such as Hezbollah and their main sponsors, the Islamic Republic of Iran.
    I sometimes think we are too quick to blame everything that goes on in the Middle East and North Africa on the West: it isn't all our fault.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I take on everything that has been said in this posting. Nevertheless, we also have an even worse situation next door in Syria and that has not been all the fault of the West, in particular the Americans, the Brits and the French as well as the Russians.
    Assad was another cruel dictator who ruled, as his father did before him, with an iron fist in a police state. His militia, the Shabbiha, was unparalleled for cruelty, torture and human rights abuses.
    When the Arab uprisings started about five and a half years ago it was widely recognised the Syria would be the most difficult nut to crack. During that time a myriad of mostly Islamist groups (also known as Takfiri, Wahhabi or Salafists) proliferated as it become a rallying call for every extremist Muslim on the planet to come and fight for Allah. In the time over 500,000 have perished, whole cities twice the size of Glasgow have been reduced to rubble and a refugee crisis of biblical proportions has engulfed Europe, not to mention neighbouring Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Interestingly, it has not affected Saudi Arabia
    My point then is this: is it not about time that we started blaming the guilty parties for all this chaos? Namely the chief characters in this are Assad, ISIS and the other Islamists such as the Al Nusra Front, the Army of Conquest, the Free Syrian Army and the Shia groups such as Hezbollah and their main sponsors, the Islamic Republic of Iran.
    I sometimes think we are too quick to blame everything that goes on in the Middle East and North Africa on the West: it isn't all our fault.

    ReplyDelete